CharlieMC (charliemc) wrote,
CharlieMC
charliemc

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As Easter Approaches... More About Eggs!

Okay, yes I'm spamming. (Amazing considering how busy I am today!)

Oh. I never mentioned that I plan to keep spamming my journal from now on, did I? LOL.

Marilyn and I agree that I should 'journal' here whenever I get a chance. We'll enjoy having the info in the future--even if no one else enjoys reading it. ROFL.

Anyway, I just found the following fascinating info on eggs! (You can teach an old dog new tricks, by the way! LOL. I just shared the egg cooking method with two neighbors, neither of whom knew it! So...)





(Some) Frequently Asked Questions About Eggs!

Question: [regarding making large batches of eggs] ...The problem many of us have run into, is the scrambled eggs turn green after we prepare them. I have tried different containers but to no avail.

Answer: Sometimes a large batch of scrambled eggs may turn green. Although not pretty, the color change is harmless. It is due to a chemical change brought on by heat and occurs when eggs are cooked at too high a temperature, held for too long, or both. Using stainless steel equipment and low cooking temperature, cooking in small batches, and serving as soon as possible after cooking will help to prevent this...

Question: Can I keep (uncooked) eggs at room temperature?

Answer: Eggs are a perishable food and should be stored in their carton in the refrigerator. For optimum quality, eggs should be used up before the "Best Before" date expires. For every hour eggs are kept at room temperature, they age an entire day.

Question: Can you eat eggs with blood spots?

Answer: Eggs with a visible blood spot on the yolk are safe for consumption. The spot can be removed with the tip of a knife...

Question: What should I do about some of my favorite egg recipes that call for raw or lightly cooked eggs?

Answer: ...Although the overall risk of egg contamination is very small, the risk of foodborne illness from eggs is highest in raw and lightly cooked dishes...

To cook eggs for these recipes, use the following methods to adapt your recipes:

Cooking Whole Eggs for Use in Recipes – As a nutritious combination of egg whites and yolks, whole eggs should be fully cooked for assured safety in recipes that call for raw or lightly cooked eggs. The following method can be used with any number of eggs and works for a variety of recipes. In a heavy saucepan, stir together the eggs and either sugar, water or other liquid from the recipe (at least 1/4 cup sugar, liquid or a combination per egg). Cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until the egg mixture coats a metal spoon with a thin film or reaches 160° F. Immediately place the saucepan in ice water and stir until the egg mixture is cool. Proceed with the recipe.

Cooking Egg Whites for Use in Recipes – Cooking egg whites before use in all recipes is recommended for full safety. The following method can be used with any number of whites and works for chilled desserts as well as Seven-Minute Frosting, Royal Icing and other frosting recipes calling for raw egg whites. In a heavy saucepan, the top of a double boiler or a metal bowl placed over water in a saucepan, stir together the egg whites and sugar from the recipe (at least 2 tablespoons sugar per white), water (1 teaspoon per white) and cream of tartar (1/8 teaspoon per each 2 whites). Cook over low heat or simmering water, beating constantly with a portable mixer at low speed, until the whites reach 160° F. Pour into a large bowl. Beat on high speed until the whites stand in soft peaks. Proceed with the recipe. (Note that you must use sugar to keep the whites from coagulating too rapidly. Test with a thermometer as there is no visual clue to doneness. If you use an unlined aluminum saucepan, eliminate the cream of tartar or the two will react and create an unattractive gray meringue.)

Question: How can I tell if my eggs have spoiled?

Answer: The faster you use your eggs, the less time any potential bacteria will have to multiply. However, when properly handled and stored, eggs rarely spoil. Instead, as an egg ages, the white becomes thinner, the yolk becomes flatter and the yolk membrane weakens.

Although these changes may affect appearance, they don’t indicate spoilage and don’t have any great effect on the nutritional quality of the egg or its functions in recipes. Rather than spoiling, if you keep eggs long enough, they’re more likely to simply dry up – especially if they’re stored in a moisture-robbing, frost-free refrigerator...

...Although it is more likely for bacteria to cause spoilage during storage, mold growth can occur under very humid storage conditions or if eggs are washed in dirty water. Molds such as Penicillum, Alternaria and Rhizopus may be visible as spots on the shell and can penetrate the shell to reach the egg.

Discard any eggs with shells – or, for hard-cooked eggs, egg white surfaces – that don’t look or feel clean, normally colored and dry. A slimy feel can indicate bacterial growth and, regardless of color, powdery spots that come off on your hand may indicate mold.




Interesting, no?

I just had June ask me this morning how long you can keep hard boiled eggs. Now I know it's for one week. (I wasn't sure--and neither was she! LOL.)
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